The Prophet and the Pueblo 48 Hour Film Festival

Pueblo 48 Hour FIlm festival Prep

The Pueblo 48 Hour Film Festival screened October 14th 2017. This year Foxy-Wolff brought a short titled The Prophet.

As with every year the Festival has a list of requirements that each video made in the 48 hour time limit must include. This year those requirements included; setting: a body of water, character: a prophet, props: a mask, an aircraft, and the number 11, and the lines: “Survival is Insufficient.” and “We were not meant for this world”. This event is sponsored by the Pueblo City County Library District and this years theme was taken from the All Pueblo Reads book Station Eleven by Emily St John Mandel.

If you’ve been following the blog you know we have been quite pressed with the coming installation of Weighting to Rise. So pressed that I didn’t think we would be able to participate this year, but Gabe would not be daunted and came up with a quick concept and script and we went to work.

Using characters from the Limited Liability Insurance Company Play set and a couple of toy planes from the Arc Gwaby pulled this little piece of madness together in no time and we were so glad to be able to participate.

Here it is folks, a true testament to human creativity and ingenuity.

Clay bodies and Slips for Weighting to Rise

Our newest installation, Weighting to Rise, engages our interest on many levels, including our love of ancient art history, conceptual evolution of religion and a contemporary understanding of archetypal imagery. The foundation for all this speculation however, is clay.

In the earliest concept drawings for this show I was thinking about terra-cotta red. I love the color but I also wanted to focus on lower kiln temperatures for this show.  The red clay reinforces the connections were making to ceramic objects of a certain age and there is no need to focus on durability or use for these forms as their true purpose is visual contemplation.

Initially we wanted to source the clay locally, from summit brick, but in cleaning out the studio in preparation for this new work we discovered a reclaim emergency. We hadn’t done any major reclaiming in years and there were hundreds of stashes of future intention in every corner of the studio. Organizing and reclaim all this detritus reframed our thinking on the project. The show is in many ways about beginnings and endings and there were so many of those in our lives when we were conceiving this show. The end of Grad school was one of the larger of these transitions and it was partly the deadline challenges of the student lifestyle that left so many bags abandoned. We just didn’t have the time for so much of what is normal studio maintenance. It seemed right then to use what we could of what we had and reclaim all the rest into a new studio body for the coming year.

Some of it we could rehydrate in the bags and wedge back to life. This is a lot of work but the clay does not have to age as much and so is more immediately useful. We slaked the rest down in buckets and mixed with dry. This clay must be aged for some time to enhance plasticity so we did the reclaiming early in the year to accommodate that need.

Reclaiming clay is heavy and demanding work so its great to get help, Gabe’s girls ran the pug mill for a day and really helped us out.

The rest of the hand wedged stuff was random small batches of the clay we had used in the studio for the last four years. There was a little more than 150 lbs of the 200 we mixed when we first moved in to this studio, about 500 lbs of reclaimable White Stone from Laguna of which we bought a ton in late 2013 and a number of clays we only had a bag or two of. These  clays were for special projects or bits friends gave us to try. It was in this last batch that we had the red clays. The one we started with and held to for the entire project was Laguna’s R2 with grog. we had a box of this from my mom who bought it and didn’t use it so it had gone hard in the bags. We started using this as a sculptural medium in the earliest pieces for the show but we found it couldn’t handle water as well as some of our preferred clay bodies so we decided to use it a slip for surface treatment and not the structure of the work.

We were especially focused on its interaction with another Laguna body, Babu porcelain. we’ve used this for years as a slip in the studio for its very smooth texture and titanium free white color. It was the interaction of these two clays that we intended to build the bones of the show.

While I focused on the structure and build techniques we would use, Gabe began experimenting with using clays alone for building up 2 dimensional images.

As the work continued we considered what to do for black and for firing temps more and more. The black we started out using was a commercially prepared engobe that needs a clear glaze over to develop the color fully. While we really liked these results the surface shift with the gloss was not something we wanted to see everywhere and the terra-cotta looks best a little warmer (Cone 01) and the glaze was 06 making once firing impossible.

From here we went off the rails a bit playing with slips and firing temps. We had a small chunk of clay we brought back from the Rain Harris workshop that I really wanted to integrate. She uses the most beautiful black clay from Aardvark, Cassius Basaltic is a cone 5 clay that is very black with a vitreous surface that is beautiful when used as a slip. Using this would eliminate the need for a clear on the black and the porcelain at least can handle the higher temps.

This switch did require a switch in red bodies. For that we wanted to go with a clay that a friend from grad school in Kansas was mining. It’s a midrange clay with a dusty red finish at cone five and we had about 30 lbs of it, plenty for slips. We really loved many aspects of this look, but the higher temps were often too much for the sketchy assembly techniques and so were abandoned. This wall hanging is the best of that combo, before and after firing

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wall hanging with face fired

It was really the bull that forced us to get real about the firing temps. The technique we used to put that together was risky enough, asking that hot mess to make high temperatures seemed like a recipe for disaster so we brought back the R2 and began looking for another black. We settled on barnard clay for that, straight out of the bag. On its own its very saturated at cone 01 and was a decent compromise.

From here we began using mixtures of various strengths for developing color in the show using the 3 main bodies as a base: Babu porcelain, barnard clay, and R2 terra-cotta

As mentioned earlier we wanted to use what we had around the studio for most of the project but there were a few pieces we wanted science on our side for. After all the struggles with using white stone for slabs that we ran into with The Magic Box, we chose to put some of the trickier aspects in a clay we knew we could rely on. Laguna’s soldate 60 is a work horse for our studio. While not the most beautiful body, its durable, fires well and so forgiving both to students and sculptors who must push edges.

Part of this winning formula is the 200 body we get from the local brick yard as an attaching slip. So much of the insanity of this show is possible because the perfect combination of Soldate with 200 binding it.

Beginning A New Installation

The Magic Box was an enormous and all-consuming project that took up huge portions of our lives over the past three years. Its ben very difficult to nail down the next installation project for Foxy-Wolff. We have been kicking around several ideas since before completing the last, and while there were elements of each idea that we found compelling, not one of them really cried out for making.

Initially we played around with a few possible sequels to the Magic Box, focused on Bob the Unicorn’s childhood, but the rigid control of the rules of that world were too constraining. Also being able to complete an entire installation in a year or less seems an interesting challenge with the potential to dramatically impact its over-all outcome. We were hoping for a work that might be less text dependent, allowing its visceral, emotional content to come to the surface.

An entirely new work seemed in order, so then it was time to begin sifting through ideas.

As one might guess, actually getting to work in the studio brought the best of these to the surface. The last post outlined the evolution of the structure and aesthetics of the upcoming work.

Process and Inspiration

Over the weeks the clay shaped up Gabe and I were refining the overall direction and intent of the installation, with Gabe providing drawings to aid in the conversation.

The concept of the show engages our fascination with ancient funerary art, and religious practices directed toward the dead. Each individual element in the gallery represents a families remembrance and the living process of creation that is the natural product of such a process. We concern ourselves  with the boundaries between worlds, feeling that riding that edge is the place where creativity rises.

Funerary art is also some of the most readily available records of extinct cultures. The pseudo-historical potential of work like this allows construction of a narrative without having to outline a specific “story”. The show marks a significant transformation of both the project (Foxy-Wolff) and our personal lives and so thinking of burial to mark that transition makes a weird kind of sense.

Elemental transformation is also a key concept for this work. the geological transformation of the rock cycle referenced through the clay mirrors the transformations of life and death; family member to ancestor. The technological aspect of the show will emphasize these by allowing us to light the gallery with fire and water  without having to work with building rules and insurance policies.

With this show we are making an offering to those who come to experience the work. In turn we give those an opportunity to offer something back to the work. By giving sand to the images and objects in the gallery, the viewer brings soul from the earth and allows it to rise, much like the fire and water of the videos.

Weighting To Rise gives us an opportunity to share our passion for the strange and beautiful, to mine the great well of myth and belief that surround death and to invite the viewer to share in the process of making the space and the installation live via their participation through action. The finely rendered paintings, made from the same material as the rest of the work  are the center piece of the show and add precision and emotion to the elemental presentation.

 

Community Revisited

Gabe and I started Foxy-Wolff when we were both working at the Art Center, Gabe as assistant Curator and myself as resident artist in the ceramic studio. That meant that the work of the first couple years of the project came out of a community studio. While much of our time working on those early projects was outside of the studio’s regular working hours, there are still considerations when working with others that just don’t come up in a private studio environment, such as putting things where others can find them and giving and receiving awkward hugs (Gabe’s favorite).

On the upside, having people around forces clearer communication and invigorates stagnant ideas with new perspectives, plus its more fun.

Our latest round of classes were an exact balance of all the goodness and just enough hugs to keep us on our toes. We hosted a small group that included friends from work, our kids and a few notable drop-ins’. The classes had a very loose structure and wound up running most of the day on the Saturday, with a fluid movement between wheel and hand building with lots of inspiring conversation throughout.

And the results? Pretty fantastic really. In addition to the batch of great ceramics we made during the 6 weeks, we are building a community that will continue our Saturday’s and the conversation.

 

Registration for Class with Foxy-Wolff

For those of you looking for an easy way to secure your spot in our upcoming classes we’ve created an Etsy listing that will allow you to register for either the 10:00 am or the 1:00 pm sessions.

https://www.etsy.com/listing/507082453/classes-with-foxy-wolff?ref=shop_home_active_1

Classes will be held at 26826 East US Highway 50, Pueblo CO, 81006. Feel free to call us if you have any questions, Kate Fox (719) 821-9105

You can also reserve a spot by using this form and paying by check or credit card on the first day of class.

Classes begin February 4th and run 6 weeks ending March 11th. There will be two Saturday sessions, the first from 10:00 am to 12:00 pm and the second from 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm. Please specify which class you are interested in.

Classes with Foxy-Wolff

I love to teach, it’s really fundamental to my identity as an artist since I learned to do both things at pretty much the same time. With the pressure of grad school and moving my life and studio around significantly I’ve not taught a good community class in years. We kept putting it off until we were “less busy” and a class never came together.

The time has finally arrived! We’ve been cleaning and planning for a while now and have set a date.

Saturday February 4th with two, two-hour sessions, one at 10:00 am and one beginning at 1:00 pm. We’re limiting enrollment to 10 per session. The class costs 120.00 and includes all of your clay, firing and materials. We will meet for 6 weeks ending March 11th, with pots and sculptures picked up in a couple of weeks after that.

The class will center around clay primarily but will have a decidedly intermedia feel. Gabe and I are really looking to build a dynamic and collaborative structure to the classes, allowing each student to follow their freak while learning some fresh technique.

Any level of experience is perfect, you don’t need to know anything coming in to the class unless you want to work with the wheel. We have 3 and would prefer those spots go to people that already know how to center. teaching and learning to throw is a close connected process and I prefer to start people out with a few private lessons or a wheel only class.

This class is for adults and serious art students of any age.

Cleaning Up at Foxy-Wolff Studio

With school and The Magic Box complete we are moving back into projects and ideas that we had to leave behind because of the limits of time. First up is the heavy cleaning/rearranging of the studio for a series of classes coming up beginning in early February.

The studio is above all a functional space and changes a great deal to suit our current project, most recently, aside from a small space for us to fill some christmas pottery orders it has been a storage space for The Magic Box. Also we’ve been so focused on that project that some of the unused corners of the studio had filled with unconsidered objects.

My grandpa loved games and puzzles and there was one he had that I played with often. It was a small plastic number slide game.

Rearranging a small space is exactly like playing this game, it’s all about how you begin. For us this meant moving the boxes, pedestals and art from The Magic Box into storage until it shows again. So the storage room was the place to start for us. Gabe is an animal about this kind of work, and he had all my personal storage lined out in an afternoon and the pedestals and the rest put away in the next few days.

While he worked that out I had to make sense of the working area. That space has a tendency to get cluttered with the remnants of works in progress, including old clay bits in need of reclaim and tools misplaced on shelves. A clean studio is not always the highest value but its great to get a clean reset before the beginning of a new project. I think it helps to keep ideas fresh and forces us to deal with the dust fairly often.

This freed up the center space, leaving only the Kuan Yin of the Magic Box on a table in the center of the room. More heavy lifting cleared a space for The Great One and we hung her where she can watch over the large front room.

The glaze room was the next priority, that involved clearing the old front office space of everything and then gathering all the materials and tools used in surfacing the ceramic in the kiln.

Critical to inviting other people to the studio to make art was lighting all of the work space. Gabe to the rescue again. Heres a funny little video he made to celebrate getting up on a ladder (again).

Look for posts coming this week with details on the upcoming series of classes.

Building the Black Church

The design of the last set piece of the Magic Box project was immensely important to the look and feel of the entire project.  This element and accompanying video is the culmination of our learning and focus on a project over two years in the making.  While the piece must work well with all those that came before, It must also reflect the inevitable learning that accompanies work of so much duration and focus.

As with the building for “The Empty Room”,  “The Black Church” was based on a building in our home town Pueblo, Colorado, the Cathedral of the Sacred Heart. While we considered many church designs for the project, we went with the cathedral because of its classical anatomy and ties to art history, which is an important element of the last video.

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We began by photographing the building.  The main challenge in “sampling” a building like this is discovering how much of the original to stay true to and how much to simplify and modify. To help make these determinations I did an extensive series of drawings, to both see the building fully and to determine the essential elements. In the initial planning stage, before the drawings, I imagined holding a large amount of the detail, feeling that was an essential part of the beauty of the building.

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The slow and deliberate process of drawing the church again and again over a period of weeks helped me to understand the soul of the building, the essential nature of the proportion and what that communicates to those on the sidewalk or inside the structure. By the end of the drawing process I was stripping away the detail and focused on the classical structure.

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From the drawing step, our building was designed, rather than the lengthy process of constructing plaster molds for each section, a heavy watercolor paper was used. This step cut at least 4 weeks from the build which allowed the full project to be completed within the semester.

For the build I broke the structure into four sections, the front section, or Facade and narthex, was built first. This allowed the rules for construction to be set on a relatively small and simple piece and to test the scale of the building against the existing works in the series and to ensure continuity of the installation. Rather than the Laguna’s whitestone that we built the empty room house with, we returned to Laguna’s soldate, a body that we have used for years with success. This decision completely solved the major mid slab cracking issues that had been such a problem with so much of the early construction. Another modification of the build  was to  let the slabs set up several days before assembly. This let the individual units do most of their drying and shrinking before they came together which reduced the amount of stress placed on each piece.

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The second section built was the naive, this section was modified from its proportion in the original building so that we could focus the filming in this section.  Because of the size modification, the roof became problematic, columns were set into the mid center of the hall to hold a sort of half ceiling. This would serve the dual purpose of holding a multi media roof that would be constructed post firing and hide the lighting system for the enclosed structure. The decision to go without decoration or windows on the building affirmed itself as the structure grew.  The exterior and the interior were beginning to be understood as separate realms.  the exterior was to exude imposing darkness and mystery in addition to be immediately recognizable as a holy or sacred place. The interior was to evoke a cave, a hidden space not easily accessible from the outside.

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The third piece was the transept. For the long roof section of this unit a sort of joist was constructed from the side wall panel pieces.

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The last piece was the choir. This was the both the smallest and most complex of the sections.

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Once all the sections were complete, they could be placed together to make decisions about the placement and shape of the passage that would span the whole interior.

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Once the interior was opened it was coated in whitestone slip, to tie it to the earlier buildings and to enhance the cave feeling for the interior shots for filming. During construction of each section a waster slab was placed beneath to limit drying and firing stress. The building was then covered and allowed to dry over several weeks.

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Once the units were dried and fired to cone 06 they were again assembled to assess the warping that took place through the long process of clay to ceramic. While we did have markedly better results with this building, each section did move throughout this time, a solution was then sought to fill the gaps between the sections that would allow light to penetrate into the building. Several solutions were considered for this but in the end we decided on vinyl  joint compound, this substance starts very soft and plastic like clay and would dry very hard to allow the building to be handled as it moves from show to show.  The first step for this was to shrink-wrap the first and third sections so that the compound would only go on  section two and four, minimizing both handling stress and cleanup. Each section was then masked for spray paint.

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The process of application and sanding back the material had to be done through several  times before we were satisfied with the fit. The visible sides were then textured to match the ceramic.

Painting was two coats of semi-gloss black spray paint with an additional two coats of a matte clear finish, this had to be tuned up several times through the finishing as the joint compound was very messy when it had to be manipulated. The interior was largely left alone, but some of the ground bisque clay used on the interior was mixed with acrylic to cover epoxy fill and to allow the heavy texture to be picked up by the camera during filming.

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Once the surface was finished, it was then time to install the lights. small battery-powered LED’s were used, hot glued into position in the roof sections using the joint compound to hide the cord running through the walls and down through the joints into a pedestal built to house them. Initially my intent was to light the interior with fire, but having ruled this impractical from a build and display standpoint,  we opted for half flashing lights.  Though labeled as the same light, we found the flashing lights had a very different temperature from the non blinkers so I applied an acrylic wash to warm up the cooler toned lights.

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Following the placement of the lights, the god tiles were epoxyed into place since their shape and the texture of the walls would not allow them to be simply placed and stay where they needed to be.

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Gabe supplied the finishing touches to the piece, first the multi media roof was constructed of similar materials as the additions to the ceramic. His intent for the addition was that it not draw attention to itself yet compliment the overall feeling of the exterior of the building.

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All these elements unite to form what we believe is an incredibly strong piece that will anchor the gallery presence of the entire installation. The last element added was subtle decoration to the exterior of the church. Gabe executed to scale, tags in black marker around the back and sides of the building. These additions tie the piece into the overall intent and work of the studio and also reward the careful viewer looking for the details that are present throughout the installation.church tag 2church tags 1

Detail and subtlety become the focus of this object, the only one in the group with no magic boxes and aside from lights no dependence on technology. This piece becomes a resting place in the work to contemplate the various layers of meaning in the Magic Box installation and video series.

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Foxy-Wolff and The Relics of Beautiful Grotesque

These pots are the remnants of the Myownian culture which left  no discernible written language. They were discovered in an old shipwreck site and comprise the only known relics of this lost culture. We are unsure as to the purpose of these jars, one theory holds that they are for fertility purposes but the disembodied babies also suggest that they may have been for funerary purposes. There was little else recoverable at the site.

The dark heavily textured portion of the vessels describe where they were exposed to the ravages of the sea, the barnacles and erosion have compromised the surface here and the viewer will notice a graduation of damage to the vessels that likely describes the shifting topography of the body of water in which they rested.

Foxy-Wolff has had exclusive rights to the site and is thrilled to present them to viewers for the first time in history. Each object has been painstakingly cleaned and cataloged and is available for viewing in the White Gallery  at the Sangre de Christo Arts Center in Pueblo Colorado through mid January. Don’t miss this historic exhibition.

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Myownian Ship Wreck; object #519. Hidden Watcher 6”

Myownian Ship Wreck; object #195. Twins Jar 10”

Myownian Ship Wreck; object #036. Baby Butterfly Jar 8.5”

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Myownian Ship Wreck; object #415. Baby Ring Jar 8.5”

Myownian Ship Wreck; object #382. Pony Ride Jar 9.5”

Myownian Ship Wreck; object #816. Horned Baby Jar 8.75”

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Myownian Ship Wreck; object #078. Window Baby Jar 8”

Myownian Ship Wreck; object #593. Baby Coat of Arms Jar 13.5”

Myownian Ship Wreck; object #667 Lobster Champion Jar 9.75”

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Myownian Ship Wreck; object #709. One Arm Jar 8”

Myownian Ship Wreck; object #948. Sun Baby Jar 13.5”

Myownian Ship Wreck; object #228. Bug Lord Jar 7”

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Myownian Ship Wreck; object #314. Bug Baby Jar 6”

Myownian Ship Wreck; object #682. Dragon Princess Jar

Myownian Ship Wreck; object #113. Running Unicorns Jar 6″

Featured Image:

Myownian Ship Wreck; object #065. Lg 100 Face Jar 9.5”

Myownian Ship Wreck; object #446. Baby King Jar 15”

Myownian Ship Wreck; object # 714 Sm 100 face Jar 7.5”

 

 

Film Festival Trophies

Every year we make the awards for the Pueblo 24 hour film festival in our home town Pueblo CO.  This year we made a video to accompany the process.  Rather than write about this one, I’ll let you watch.

The screening was this weekend and the entire event was very successful, with 25 entries and 18 films for judging.  The big winners of the night were the makers of a film called “The Brighter Side”, Gabe and I were lucky to catch up with the winning team, Lyonman productions at the event to offer congratulations.FullSizeRender

You can view the film here:

The festival is in its 7th year and is growing steadily, If you are interested in learning more or possibly entering a film next year, their website will fill you in of the details:

http://pueblo24hourfilmfestival.com

You can also watch the films from previous years at this address.